Recent Fire Damage Posts

Sleeping With Your Bedroom Door Closed Could Save Your Life

4/12/2021 (Permalink)

Notice the difference in the charring of the hallway versus the unburned walls in the bedroom.

Public Service Announcement: This picture taken by our firefighters while they operated at a structure fire today in The Hideout, Lake Township, Wayne County, shows proof that sleeping with your bedroom door closed could save your life. Notice the difference in the charring of the hallway versus the unburned walls in the bedroom. First arriving crews arrived to find heavy fire engulfing the entire home. The home was a total loss.

Research has shown that a closed bedroom door can slow the spread of flames, decrease temperatures, reduce smoke inhalation, and improve oxygen levels in the room.

Just a few decades ago the average time it took to escape a home fire was about 17 minutes. Now it is three minutes or less. This is because of the synthetic furniture, more open floor plans in homes, and other flammable materials. Just closing your bedroom door at night can give you more time to get out the bedroom windows safely and call the fire department.

Research proves that a closed door during a fire, can mean the difference between 1,000 degrees temperatures and 100 degrees temperatures. Keep your bedroom door closed to keep the extra heat out!

During a fire, a closed door can also keep carbon monoxide levels at 1,000 PPM verses 10,000 PPM when a door is left open.

Close Before You Doze. Statistics show that in 2019, every three hours and ten minute, someone dies in a house fire. Do your part and don’t become part of the statistics.

If you live in Jefferson County and are interested in joining their team, visit www.29firerescue.com/membership/ for more information.

Top 10 Tips for Deep Frying a Turkey

11/23/2020 (Permalink)

The current pandemic may be keeping us from seeing our families this Thanksgiving, but that's not going to stop some of us from deep frying our turkeys. If you fall into that group, especially if this is your first time, take a minute to make sure you are doing it as safely as possible.

Here are the Top 10 tips for safely deep frying a turkey:

  1. Keep outdoor fryers off decks, out of garages and a safe distance away from trees and other structures.
  2. Make sure the turkey is thawed and dry before cooking. Ice or water that mixes into the hot oil can cause flare-ups.
  3. Watch the weather. Never operate a fryer outdoors in the rain or snow.
  4. Place the fryer on a level surface, and avoid moving it once it's in use.
  5. Leave 2 feet between the tank and the burner when using a propane-powered fryer.
  6. Follow the manufacturer's instructions to avoid overfilling. Oil can ignite when it makes contact with the burner.
  7. Choose a smaller turkey for frying. A bird that's 8 to 10 pounds is best; pass on turkeys over 12 pounds.
  8. Purchase a fryer with temperature controls, and watch the oil temperature carefully. Cooking oil that is heated beyond its smoke point can catch fire. If you notice the oil is smoking, turn the fryer off.
  9. Turn off the burner before lowering the turkey into the oil. Once the turkey is submerged, turn the burner on.
  10. Keep children and pets away from the fryer at all times.

Source: State Farm

Top 5 Hazards of Kerosene Heaters

11/20/2020 (Permalink)

If you are one of the many homes and businesses around Monroe and Pike County that use a kerosene heater, you should take precautions against a number of serious hazards.

Here are the Top 5

1) Fire Fire could be caused by operating the heater too close to furniture, draperies or other combustibles, by knocking over a lighted heater, or by accidentally igniting fuel when filling the tank.

2) Explosions Explosions could be caused by use of the wrong kind of fuel, or by operating the heater in an area where there are combustible fumes.

3) Burns Burns could be caused by direct contact with a heater, or by ignition of combustible clothing. Children especially should be kept at a safe distance from operating heaters. Even pets could be injured.

4) Asphyxiation Kerosene heaters consume oxygen as they burn. If they are operated in a small room or in an inadequately ventilated area, oxygen in the air could be reduced to a dangerous level. Reduced oxygen supply could lead to incomplete combustion of fuel and the production of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas which in sufficient concentrations, or if breathed over a period of time, can kill without warning.

5) Indoor air pollution In addition to carbon monoxide, kerosene heaters can emit such pollutants as carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide. Breathing these substances can create a risk, especially to such people as pregnant women, asthmatics, individuals with cardiovascular disease, elderly persons and young children.

Source: iii

Top 5 Features of Radiant Kerosene Heaters

11/20/2020 (Permalink)

Radiant heaters - usually rectangular in shape - are designed for smaller areas. They also feature a wick and combustion chamber and have, in addition, a reflector which directs heat at people or objects.

1) Removable Fuel Tank Having a removable fuel tank means that the heater can stay in place. Only the fuel tank needs to be carried to where the fuel is stored. A radiant heater without a removable fuel tank must be moved for each refueling - just like a convective model.

2) (UL) Label Be sure your heater has a recognized seal of approval such as the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) label. The UL label means the heater has performed well under test conditions and meets acceptable fire safety standards.

3) Battery-Operated Lighting Device Be sure your heater has a battery-operated lighting device — it eliminates the need for matches.

4) Safety Shutoff Device Heaters should have a safety shutoff device, which extinguishes the flame if the unit is jarred or tipped over.

5) Electric Fan Electric fans will increase the flow of warm air from the heater.

Source: iii

Top 10 Kerosene Heater Safety Tips - Part 1

11/20/2020 (Permalink)

Safety First!

Here is the first half of the Top 10 important safety tips to consider if you plan on using a kerosene heater this winter:

1) Wick Check the wick every week or two during the heating season. If it's dirty, clean it according to the manufacturer's instructions.

2) Spills Wipe up any kerosene spillage at once - it's a fire hazard - and to remove dust and dirt regularly.

3) Proper Fuel Never use a substitute such as gasoline or camp stove fuel. In a kerosene heater, such fuels could start a fire or explode. Kerosene heaters require 1-K grade kerosene. When colored or cloudy kerosene is burned, it will give off an odor, smoke and cause increased indoor pollution levels because the fuel's higher sulphur content sharply boosts sulphur dioxide emissions. And kerosene other than 1-K grade can gum up the wick. 

4) Keep Your Distance Place kerosene heaters several feet away from all furniture, curtains, papers, clothes, bedding and other combustible materials.

5) Free of Fumes Do not use a kerosene heater in a room where there are flammable solvents, aerosol sprays, lacquers, gasoline, kerosene containers or any type of oil.

Source: iii

Top 10 Kerosene Heater Safety Tips - Part 2

11/20/2020 (Permalink)

Safety First!

Here is the second half of the Top 10 important safety tips for your kerosene heaters:

6) Kids and Pets Parents of babies, toddlers and young children, as well as pet owners, should be aware that touching any part of an operating kerosene heater above the open flame could result in a serious burn.

7) Safety Cages Use a safety cage to keep small children and pets at a distance.

8) Moving Never attempt to move a lighted kerosene heater. Even a carrying handle could cause a burn. Extinguish the flame and allow the heater to cool before moving it.

9) Refueling Never refuel a kerosene heater in living quarters or when the heater is still hot. Wait for it to cool.

10) Sleeping Turn off your kerosene heater before you go to sleep. Fire officials strongly urge to use your central heating system while the family is sleeping.

Source: iii

From 50 Firefighters to Re-Opened

7/29/2020 (Permalink)

Fire at 6:00 AM

An early morning kitchen fire on Monday caused heavy damage at Tony’s Restaurant & Pizzeria, a landmark pizza shop on Crystal Street in East Stroudsburg.

The fire, reported by an automatic fire alarm just before 6 a.m., not only temporarily knocked Tony’s out of business but left three apartments unlivable, and five people without a place to stay, said Fire Chief Dale Fetterly.

The fire also left a big question mark over when Tony’s neighbor, Derailed Taphouse, would reopen.

“Not sure yet,” said owner Marc Jackett, who opened the business last summer. He said it was difficult to determine what was damaged because there was no electrical or gas service to the building...

Enter SERVPRO

SERVPRO came in as soon as the scene was secure.  While SERVPRO cleaned the interior of Derailed from top to bottom, owners worked on getting electric and gas restored. After a fast and thorough SERVPRO cleaning, Derailed was able to reopen at 5:00pm that same day, less than 12 hours after the first alarm.

Source: Pocono Record

Kerosene Heater Safety I

11/19/2019 (Permalink)

If you use a kerosene heater in your home or place of business, you should take precautions against a number of serious hazards.

These dangers include:

Fire or explosion. Fire could be caused by operating the heater too close to furniture, draperies or other combustibles, by knocking over a lighted heater, or by accidentally igniting fuel when filling the tank. Explosions could be caused by use of the wrong kind of fuel, or by operating the heater in an area where there are combustible fumes.

Burns. Burns could be caused by direct contact with a heater, or by ignition of combustible clothing. Children especially should be kept at a safe distance from operating heaters. Even pets could be injured.

Asphyxiation. Kerosene heaters consume oxygen as they burn. If they are operated in a small room or in an inadequately ventilated area, oxygen in the air could be reduced to a dangerous level. Reduced oxygen supply could lead to incomplete combustion of fuel and the production of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas which in sufficient concentrations, or if breathed over a period of time, can kill without warning.

Indoor air pollution. In addition to carbon monoxide, kerosene heaters can emit such pollutants as carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide. Breathing these substances can create a risk, especially to such people as pregnant women, asthmatics, individuals with cardiovascular disease, elderly persons and young children.

These hazards can be minimized or averted by carefully following manufacturers' instructions for use of kerosene heaters, and by adopting other common-sense safety measures.

Source: www.iii.org

Kerosene Heater Safety II

11/19/2019 (Permalink)

Picking the model

There are two types of portable kerosene heaters - convective and radiant.

The convective heater usually is circular in shape. Its fuel tank is located below the wick and combustion chamber. The wick absorbs and delivers fuel to the combustion chamber.

Convective heaters circulate warm air upward and outward in all directions. They're designed for large areas or even several rooms, but never for a small, closed area such as a bedroom. Some owners report that one or two of these units can adequately heat an entire house when the temperature stays above freezing.

Convective heaters must be moved for refueling because they don't have a removable fuel tank. Generally, refueling is done with a siphon pump. Be sure a convective heater has a fuel gauge.

Radiant heaters - usually rectangular in shape - are designed for smaller areas. They also feature a wick and combustion chamber and have, in addition, a reflector which directs heat at people or objects. Some radiant heaters have electric fans to increase the flow of warm air.

Many - but not all - radiant models have a removable fuel tank, which means that the heater can stay in place. Only the fuel tank needs to be carried to where the fuel is stored.

A radiant heater without a removable fuel tank must be moved for each refueling - just like a convective model.

Be sure your heater has a recognized seal of approval such as the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) label. The UL label means the heater has performed well under test conditions and meets acceptable fire safety standards.

Also be sure your heater has a battery-operated lighting device — it eliminates the need for matches.

Heaters should have a safety shutoff device, which extinguishes the flame if the unit is jarred or tipped over.

Source: www.iii.org

Kerosene Heater Safety III

11/19/2019 (Permalink)

Dealing with hazards

A well-designed kerosene heater emits no smoke or strong odor during normal operation. But you might notice a faint kerosene odor when you enter the house.

There's also a strong odor from kerosene heaters for several minutes when they're turned on or off and when they run out of fuel. Thus, it's a good idea to check the fuel gauge regularly.

But the real danger is that misuse of kerosene heaters could replace room oxygen with carbon monoxide and lead to death by asphyxiation.

Therefore, it's important to have adequate ventilation to other rooms, and a source of fresh, outside air such as a window or door open at least one inch whenever you're using a kerosene heater.

Emission of other major pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide, carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide is an extra reason why you need adequate ventilation and fresh, outside air.

Kerosene heaters could be especially hazardous in bedrooms, particularly when units designed to heat large spaces are used in small rooms.

"You need to keep an eye on a kerosene heater and if you're sleeping, you're not going to be able to do that," warns a fire protection engineer.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission, a federal government agency, has recommended strengthening of voluntary safety standards by manufacturers and continued public education regarding proper use of kerosene heaters.

Source: www.iii.org

Kerosene Heater Safety IV

11/19/2019 (Permalink)

Using it safely

If you purchase a portable kerosene heater, you'll have to allow time for buying fuel, fueling the heater and taking care of maintenance.

You'll need to check the wick every week or two during the heating season. If it's dirty, clean it according to the manufacturer's instructions.

It's also essential to wipe up any kerosene spill-age at once - it's a fire hazard - and to remove dust and dirt regularly.

Kerosene heaters require 1-K grade kerosene. When colored or cloudy kerosene is burned, it will give off an odor, smoke and cause increased indoor pollution levels because the fuel's higher sulphur content sharply boosts sulphur dioxide emissions. And kerosene other than 1-K grade can gum up the wick. Never use a substitute such as gasoline or camp stove fuel. In a kerosene heater, such fuels could start a fire or explode.

To avoid the risk of fire even in normal operation you should place kerosene heaters several feet away from all furniture, curtains, papers, clothes, bedding and other combustible materials.

Remember that kerosene heaters have a constant open flame and should not be used in a room where there are flammable solvents, aerosol sprays, lacquers, gasoline, kerosene containers or any type of oil.

Parents of babies, toddlers and young children, as well as pet owners, should be aware that touching any part of an operating kerosene heater above the open flame could result in a serious burn.

This is why safety cages - designed to keep small children and pets at a distance - have become popular.

Never attempt to move a lighted kerosene heater. Even a carrying handle could cause a burn. Extinguish the flame and allow the heater to cool before moving it.

And never refuel a kerosene heater in living quarters or when the heater is still hot. Wait for it to cool.

Fire officials strongly urge that kerosene heaters be turned off before you go to sleep. It's better to use your central heating system while the family is sleeping.

Source: www.iii.org

Kerosene Heater Safety V

11/19/2019 (Permalink)

Handling fuel

With a portable kerosene heater, you'll be making frequent trips to a kerosene fuel dealer, unless you're on a delivery route.

One large convective heater operating 15 hours a day needs up to 14 gallons of fuel a week - an amount that would require three five-gallon kerosene containers. Be sure the containers are clearly marked "Kerosene."

It's dangerous to mix gasoline and kerosene - or their containers. Never use a gasoline can as a substitute for a kerosene container.

Once you get the containers back home, you'll need a place to keep the kerosene cans and to refuel the heater.

In both cases, a garage is preferable to the house. If there's no garage, a basement location distant from the central heating system or an outside storage shed are possibilities.

Resist the temptation to refuel a hot kerosene heater in a warm house - it's like playing with dynamite! And never smoke during refueling.

Follow the siphon pump instructions and fill only about 90 percent of the tank. Cold kerosene expands in a heater tank as it warms to room temperature and could overflow if there isn't enough room.
Return the heater to the spot where it will be turned on. Open at least one window slightly and ignite the heater according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Source: www.iii.org

Kerosene Heater Safety

11/19/2018 (Permalink)

Kerosene Heater

If you use a kerosene heater in your home or place of business, you should take precautions against a number of serious hazards.

These dangers include:

Fire or explosion. Fire could be caused by operating the heater too close to furniture, draperies or other combustibles, by knocking over a lighted heater, or by accidentally igniting fuel when filling the tank. Explosions could be caused by use of the wrong kind of fuel, or by operating the heater in an area where there are combustible fumes.

Burns. Burns could be caused by direct contact with a heater, or by ignition of combustible clothing. Children especially should be kept at a safe distance from operating heaters. Even pets could be injured.

Asphyxiation. Kerosene heaters consume oxygen as they burn. If they are operated in a small room or in an inadequately ventilated area, oxygen in the air could be reduced to a dangerous level. Reduced oxygen supply could lead to incomplete combustion of fuel and the production of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas which in sufficient concentrations, or if breathed over a period of time, can kill without warning.

Indoor air pollution. In addition to carbon monoxide, kerosene heaters can emit such pollutants as carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Breathing these substances can create a risk, especially to such people as pregnant women, asthmatics, individuals with cardiovascular disease, elderly persons and young children.

These hazards can be minimized or averted by carefully following manufacturers' instructions for use of kerosene heaters, and by adopting other common-sense safety measures.

Source: Insurance Information Institute

Large Loss Fire Call

8/27/2018 (Permalink)

One of the main responsibilities of being a SERVPRO franchise is to jump into action and get to the job right away. The team at SERVPRO is always training and preparing for the next big loss. The team here at SERVPRO is highly trained in fire damage remediation. Last month alone the team went out to a very large fire job and handled it with ease. The team was on site hours after it was cleared safely by the fire marshall. The team jumped right in by bagging up wet and soot damaged contents. Then began the very time-consuming process of getting all the walls and other parts of the building wiped down and cleaned. The building had over 20 apartments and 10 business operating in it before the loss. The main objective for the team at SERVPRO was to get these businesses and apartments cleaned and back to normal without hindering the tenants in any way. The team worked hard and exceeded everyone's expectations on the job. 

Large Loss Fire Damage

8/1/2018 (Permalink)

One of the main responsibilities of being a SERVPRO franchise is to jump into action and get to the job right away. The team at SERVPRO is always training and preparing for the next big loss. The team here at SERVPRO is highly trained in fire damage remediation. Last month alone the team went out to a very large fire job and handled it with ease. The team was on site hours after it was cleared safely by the fire marshall. The team jumped right in by bagging up wet and soot damaged contents . Then began the very time-consuming process of getting all the walls and other parts of the building wiped down and cleaned. The building had over 20 apartments and 10 business operating in it before the loss. The main objective for the team at SERVPRO was to get these businesses and apartments cleaned and back to normal without hindering the tenants in any way. The team worked hard and exceeded everyone's expectations on the job. 

Fire in the house

5/16/2018 (Permalink)

Fire damage is very devastating when the house or office you know and love go up in flames. The team at SERVPRO Southern Monroe works day in and day out training and mastering the craft of the aftermath of a fire loss. When the loss occurs the team from SERVPRO will be on the site once the smoke clears and the fireman says its safe to go in. The team will then conduct a full scope of the structure to find problem areas. Once the problem areas have been defined the team will then put a scope of work together. Once the team begins the process in the matter of no time your home or office will look like new. The team will work day and night to make sure you are satisfied with the work the SERVPRO team has done. When you're in a jam call 570-424-2290!

HELP OUT!

2/5/2018 (Permalink)

On the night of January 28, our family's home was lost in a devastating fire.  21 years of memories burned to ashes in front of our eyes in minutes that felt like hours.

My family lost EVERYTHING physical and sentimental - furniture, clothes, valuables, photo albums.  Our entire possessions accumulated over 21 years, a home that witnessed the growth of 9 children, gone before our eyes, leaving our family without a place to call home.

My younger siblings, Brenden (9), Sarah (11), Marissa (16), Ryan (19), and my parents, thankfully, escaped with their lives; but all that made up their lives - our lives - is buried beneath ashes and charred waste.

Fortunately, my family made it out of the house safely. We have not been able to find one of our kitties, but thankfully the other two have been found.

We are looking to raise funds to pay for clothing and other necessities that may arise.

Please, please share this message and help us raise donations in this moment of desperation.

This was an incredibly traumatic nightmare that we as a family never imagined experiencing and are not prepared for.  We are so thankful for the community's 
kindness and support.

We also want to thank all the volunteer fire departments as well as the state police for their professionalism and aid in our time of need.

We thank you for any help you can offer, by donating or sharing this page.

PFESI Training

11/30/2017 (Permalink)

Over the last few months, SERVPRO of Southern Monroe has had the opportunity to rub elbows with some of Pennsylvania's finest when it comes to Fire and Ems Services. Over the weekend of 18th of November Anthony (SMR) attended the 27th annual PFESI Dinner. At the dinner, the Board of directors came up and gave awards out to some of the most influential members of the group. Also during the dinner, there was a moment of silence for those men and women we lost in the line of duty. SERVPRO is a major sponsor of the PFESI and works alongside the fire and EMS on a daily basis. One thing to take away from the event was the commitment to the community that all of our Fire and EMS members have. The really create a strong sense of community in their actions. 

Why you need a professional to clean smoke damage in your home or business

10/20/2017 (Permalink)

After a fire, your house is left with lingering smoke that can be harmful to your health and property. The best thing to do in such a situation is to clean smoke immediately because if you ignore it, the smoke will cause massive damage on your property which will require more money to clean than if you had cleaned it soon enough. If the smoke is not cleaned as soon as possible, the items that will be most affected by smoke are drapes, carpets, upholstery, and walls because they will become permanently discolored. Glass will become extremely etched, and metals will tarnish which will require replacement.

You might think that you can do a good job at cleaning smoke by yourself without any basic knowledge and skills on how to go about it but this can lead to you causing further damage on the items. The best thing to do will be to hire experienced professionals from a reputable company to do the cleaning and restore the home to the state it was in before the fire disaster struck.

One of the advantages of using experts to clean soot is that they have specialized tools which are crucial in eliminating smoke. These are tools such as extractors, rotary scrubbers, and wet cleaning tools. Another advantage is that they have a lot of experience in doing such work; therefore, they will know the right steps to take in cleaning hour home and preventing further damage to your property.

When they come to your home, the first thing they will do is to assess the extent of the damage and determine where the odors are coming from. They will then vacuum the whole house to remove any traces of soot. Soot is dangerous because it can cause breathing complications besides damaging property. After they finish vacuuming, they will cover the carpets and furniture to prevent more dirt from settling on them. They will also identify what can and cannot be replaced and advise you accordingly. Once they find the source of the odor they will use specialized detergents to treat it and eliminate the smell completely.

What to do after a fire

10/20/2017 (Permalink)

Once in a while lady luck goes against us and we are struck by calamities such as fire. Fire can be caused by:

  • Human errors such as forgotten candles
  • Electrical Faults
  • Cigarettes
  • Home appliances
  • Gases and chemicals
  • Heating
  • Arson

Even with smoke detectors in place, fire can raze down an entire building or parts of the building leaving considerable damage in its trail. Long after the firefighters have left the question on most house owners minds is what next? The damage is both financially and emotionally draining. Loss of personal property and disruption of regular life is frustrating. It may involve moving out to a new home while the damages are repaired and for business, it leads to an immediate loss of income.

Restoration

Once you have met with your insurance provider, you then seek a firm that specializes in restoration. You need a company that has an excellent reputation and will help rebuild your house. Not everybody that promises to bring back your premises' lost glory will deliver. When contracting a restoration company in Manhattan consider the following:

Speed

Restoration should be carried out as quickly as possible. You want to restore normalcy within the shortest time possible. If it's business, it should be up and running within a relatively short period. You don't want to work with someone that will drag the repairs for months. Speed does not mean poor maintenance. It is possible to achieve good quality renovation in a short period using the right staff and equipment.

Professional

Ensure the firm you select has experienced and qualified staff. The staff should also be trustworthy; your belongings should remain safe even as you open your home or business to 'strangers.' They should possess the modern and efficient equipment to be used in renovation and cleaning. State of the art equipment ensures a thorough cleaning and does not leave any traces behind. The staff should show empathy to their clients as they are going through a rough time.

Recognizing the 3 Different Types of Fire Damages

7/11/2017 (Permalink)

This fire has left smoke residues on the walls surfaces.

Synthetic: A synthetic fire is caused by the burning of oil substances. These materials include plastics and fabrics. Some examples of these materials include furniture, draperies, electronics and carpet fibers. When these products are burned a thick-black smoke often appears. If a synthetic fire takes place in your home the best cleaning method would be to first vacuum the surface. Finish up the cleaning process with a dry-chem sponge.

Protein: A protein fire can be caused by the burning of meat products. These fires will often leave behind a yellow-ish brown residue. Cleaning these fires can be very difficult due to their greasy nature. It is best that you use the proper cleaning chemical when dealing with these smoke residues.

Natural: A natural fire is caused by the burning of a wood or paper substance. These fires produce a greyish-black smoke and are one of the easiest fires to clean. When cleaning these fires use a vacuum that has a bristled brush followed up by the use of a dry-chem sponge.

Now that you are aware of the different types of fires you may encounter and how to distinguish them. You will be able to apply the proper cleaning procedures stated above.

Monroe County Smoke and Soot Cleanup

5/15/2017 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Southern Monroe County will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?


Call Us Today – 
570-424-2290